Business

Business management explores how businesses are run and the issues they face. Whether you're an entrepreneur or are curious about different business models, these articles will answer some of the most common questions about the world of business.


Why get stuck with a useless jersey when your favorite football star gets traded to another team? A new company lets you switch out shirts as often as you wish.

We explain why Ikea stores are designed like a lazy river, why their meatballs are considered "framing devices" and what's behind those darn flat pack boxes.

The 1993 case of Earring Magic Ken shows how marketing and focus groups can inadvertently create a kitsch classic. Mattel found this out the hard way when they asked little girls to offer input.

People claim to hate pop-ups ads, and their more recent successor, the hover ad. Yet they still click on them. Here's why.

How did this teen magazine go from just covering fashion and beauty to getting lauded for its political coverage?

A new study reveals that shape, size and sense of touch influence purchasing choices, thanks to some curious cognition and perception.

In some industries — like advertising — the awards show is just a giant money-making scheme.

One hundred percent of female mannequins in a new U.K. study represented underweight individuals, while only 8 percent of male mannequins did the same.

According to a new paper by tech company Polycom, "anywhere working" is on the rise in several countries, and employees recognize its advantages.

With the demise of mall staples like The Limited, the brands hanging on will have to rethink their entire approach to fashion to survive the 'mall-pocalypse.'

Is your cluttered desk a sign of creative genius or just chaos? Experts weigh in on whether either is really a true reflection of how your brain operates.

Mike Marts, the AfterShock editor-in-chief and co-founder, looks back at the diverse roster of titles and genres published by the new company.

The annual employee engagement survey seems pretty useless. So what are some alternatives?

As more toll roads move away from cash, where does that leave drivers who don't have electronic passes? Or even exact change?

If human nutrition is essentially universal, why do yogurt commercials feature women so prominently?

It's not so easy to leave Sunday's blowout game behind when it's time to go to work on Monday. A new study has some ideas on how companies can handle this issue.

You may be surprised at the types of businesses people have put on wheels. Cigar Lounge, anyone?

In an effort to discourage food waste, some all-you-can-eat buffets are charging diners whose eyes are bigger than their stomachs.

In fact, you might want to consider which CEOs get the lowest pay when you're picking stocks to buy.

A Japanese company called ALE wants to create artificial meteor showers. Is this the first step toward the sky becoming a massive ad?

HowStuffWorks Now interviews Rooster Teeth's Burnie Burns at SXSW on how to crowdfund a feature-length film.

Does it seem like ads for cruises are always popping up since you went to one vacation website? Researchers study the line between being conscious and being aggravated.

A startup app called OneGo aims to find a niche as a provider of all-you-can-fly pricing for domestic air travel, for those who can afford the monthly membership.

You can learn about leadership in the darnedest of places. Like the 1980s television program "The Transformers."