Economics

Curious about capitalism, the monetary system or white collar crime? Check out these articles. The Economics Channel defines and explores economic terms and controversies.


New research posits a simple way to get rid of household clutter and keep your precious memories: Snap a picture.

U.S. politicians talk a lot about trying to save coal mining jobs, while saying little about losses in significantly larger sectors like retail. Why the disconnect?

Post-Brexit, applications for Estonia's e-Residency program are soaring. But what does becoming an Estonian e-Resident actually allow you to do?

A new study examined the morality of cab drivers — in Athens, Greece — when dealing with business travelers.

Fewer people carry cash, preferring to pay with cards or smartphone apps. What impact does that have on those who rely on pocket change?

Saying that all it takes to succeed in the U.S. is effort and personal responsibility is an oversimplification of the actual circumstances surrounding poverty.

Poverty has always been measured with money in the U.S., but a new study finds that when we focus only income, there's a lot we don't see.

Nonprofits have started pushing Giving Tuesday to get more donations. But does it work?

The California National Guard bonus scandal had us wondering if civilians would have to repay an overage in their paychecks.

More U.S. women are planning on having babies, says the CDC. What's behind the birth rate bump?

On average, black women in the U.S. workforce earned $0.37 less for every dollar a man in the U.S. workforce earned in 2014. That's a pretty big wage gap.

Massachusetts just passed a law barring companies from asking prospective employees for salary history. Will that level the playing field for women and minorities?

As cities develop, how can technology be used to accommodate growing populations?

It's been a roller-coaster ride for the beloved U.S. snack cake that last 65 days. Now Twinkies and its other Hostess buddies are landing on the Nasdaq.

John Oliver paid off medical debt for 9,000 Americans. But could you buy your own debt on the cheap?

Is adding up the inflation and unemployment rates the most effective way to judge our misery?

An 1864 law bars living people from appearing on U.S. currency. What do you have to do to get your grill on a bill?

It's adios, Old Hickory, as the freedom fighter replaces the slave-owning president. The U.S. Treasury also says Hamilton will remain on the $10 bill.

The guys from Stuff They Don't Want You to Know catch you up on the largest single leak in human history.

Sure, ride-sharing is a big part of the collaborative economy, but other services, from health care to energy credits, are turning consumers into borrowers, too.

The gender pay gap is usually expressed something like this: Women make 77 cents for every dollar a man makes. Where did this figure come from and is it still true?

The idea is that the government gives everyone a set amount of money, just for existing. Would it fly in the U.S.?

Basic income is guaranteed to everybody, no matter who you are, whether you work or not. And it could be way simpler than some existing welfare systems.

Financial difficulty can produce measurable negative impacts on physical well-being, including real pain and a lowered pain tolerance.

Let's shed some light on how and why political donations can be so tricky.