Economics

Curious about capitalism, the monetary system or white collar crime? Check out these articles. The Economics Channel defines and explores economic terms and controversies.

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Shares of the video game retailer GameStop soared after investors teamed up to run up the price. Then several online brokers halted the sale of the stock. But why?

By Jena Martin

UBI is 'basic' in that it meets your basic needs, and it's 'guaranteed income' in that you know that it's coming. Pilot programs want to test whether having UBI can change your life for better. And can we afford it?

By Dave Roos

If you buy anything via a loan, like a house or car, the bank puts a lien on that property until it is paid off. But liens can also be placed on your property by other folks and without your consent, depending on circumstances.

By Francisco Guzman

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Alimony is on the decline in the U.S. but can still bring out a highly emotional response during divorce. Here's what you need to know about alimony.

By Dave Roos

Just when America seemed to be getting over the great toilet paper shortage, the next thing in short supply was coins. But why?

By Dave Roos

Most U.S. currency contains a serial number that ends with a letter, but some end or begin with a star instead. What does the letter stand for? What is the significance of the star?

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Gas prices have plummeted across the U.S. since the coronavirus pandemic. That might be a good thing for your wallet, but is it good for the economy? It depends.

By Cherise Threewitt

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Around the world, people convert their money into U.S. dollars for safety, making it the de facto global currency. But how did the U.S. dollar become so mighty and could it ever be replaced?

By Dave Roos

In challenging economic times, people often turn to gold as a hedge against a falling stock market. But is this a good idea?

By Dave Roos

During volatile periods in stock markets, exchanges will often employ "circuit breakers" to keep stock prices from falling too far too fast. So how do these work around the world?

By Dave Roos

Economics law says that demand goes down when price goes up. But Veblen goods work the opposite way – when price goes up, so does demand. How do these goods get so lucky?

By Dave Roos

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Bill Gates thinks it should. Payroll taxes from workers fund Social Security, Medicare and defense among other federal programs. But other experts firmly disagree.

By Dave Roos

What happens when your cash gets damaged due to fire, flood or Fido deciding to eat it? Are you just out of luck?

By Patty Rasmussen

Good luck predicting the economic future; even the experts get it wrong. But there are sure warning signs to look for when a recession is ahead.

By Dave Roos

The right to repair movement advocates for consumers' rights to repair and modify their own products. Who would be against that? We'll explain.

By Cherise Threewitt

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The design of the U.S. $1 bill is full of symbolism. We'll tell you what it all means.

By Sarah Gleim

Hedge funds might seem like something only the very rich have to think about but actually they are actually part of everyday life. What are they and why are they so risky?

By Danielle Douez

Do you yarn to help others with your crafty skills? If so check out some great charities looking for some knitting assistance.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

This economic policy has been embraced by free-market capitalists and demonized by progressive reformers. But what does it really mean?

By Dave Roos

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Penny stocks may seem like a good deal because they're so cheap and who knows, they could make money! But penny stocks can also be places for scam artists, so how do you protect yourself?

By Dave Roos

Who takes the hit when the U.S. president levies tariffs on our trading partners?

By Patrick J. Kiger

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is built on an alliance between 29 North American and European countries. But it's much more than that.

By Marshall Brain & Sarah Gleim

The gender pay gap is usually expressed something like this: Women make 80 cents for every dollar a man makes. Where did this figure come from and is it still true?

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

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Ever lost a bag when traveling? This story might just warm your heart and help to ease your pain.

By Laurie L. Dove

Many Midwestern and New England states are hoping to attract more residents by offering cash, student loan forgiveness and other incentives. But surprisingly, no one has studied whether these programs are effective.

By Dave Roos