Banking Image Gallery
Banking Image Gallery

Banking Image Gallery When you put your money into a money market savings account it earns interest just like in a regular savings account. See more banking pictures.

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A money market account is a type of savings account offered by banks and credit unions just like regular savings accounts. The difference is that they usually pay higher interest, have higher minimum balance requirements (sometimes $1000-$­2500), and only allow three to six withdrawals per month. Another difference is that, similar to a checking account, many money market accounts will let you write up to three checks each month.

With bank accounts, the money in a money market account is insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), which means that even if the bank or credit union goes out of business, your money will still be there. The FDIC is an independent agency of the federal government that was created in 1933 because thousands of banks had failed in the 1920s and early 1930s. Not a single person has lost money in a bank or credit union that was insured by the FDIC since it began. With credit unions, the money in a money market account is insured by the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA), a federal agency.