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How the LSAT Works


If you want to be a lawyer in the United States, Canada or Australia, you're going to have to take the LSAT.
If you want to be a lawyer in the United States, Canada or Australia, you're going to have to take the LSAT.

So, you want to be a lawyer. You've worked hard in college to keep your GPA high, and you've carefully researched law schools to find the one you'd like to attend. There's only one thing left standing in your way before you can complete your applications: the LSAT. But what is the LSAT, and why does it instill fear and dread in so many students?

The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) is a standardized test given to all law school applicants. It's similar to the SAT exam you took in high school but is aimed at those looking to enter the legal profession. The test is developed and administered by the Law School Admissions Council (LSAC), and it can play a major role in getting into law school.

Law schools are accredited by the American Bar Association (ABA), which is a professional organization that represents the legal community. All ABA-accredited law schools in the United States, Canada and Australia require applicants to submit LSAT scores as part of the admissions process. These scores not only determine whether you'll get into the law school of your choice, but can also have an impact on future ABA membership as well as career opportunities.

Contrary to popular belief, the LSAT doesn't measure a person's legal knowledge. It's a test of logic and reasoning, as well as reading comprehension and critical thinking. It indicates the candidate's ability to succeed in law school, as well as in the legal profession.

If this test isn't about all the legal knowledge you've gained in your pre-law classes, how are you supposed to prepare for the LSAT? Read on to the next section to learn about the different study options that are available for test-takers and where you can find official practice tests.


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