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Is there an easy way to spot money-making scams?

        Money | Scams

What to Do If You're a Scam Victim

If you suspect a money-making opportunity is a scam, cease all contact with the fraudster. Sometimes he or she will string you along by asking for even more money so you can get back the funds you're already owed. Then report him or her. Although it's only natural to feel embarrassed when a scammer takes advantage of you (and your finances), it's important to take action.

If you've sent a check or scheduled a payment using your bank account or a credit card, contact your bank or card issuer to stop the transaction. Tell them of the fraud, so they can monitor your account for suspicious activity. If the scammer has accessed personal information and opened credit or checking accounts using your identity, review your credit report and institute a fraud alert [source: Caregiver Stress].

The next crucial step is to alert the authorities. In the U.S., report the fraud to the attorney general's office in the state where you live and, if different, the state where the money-making schemer lives. You also should contact the county or state consumer protection agency, the Better Business Bureau (in your area and the schemer's area) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), a U.S. organization whose aim is to prevent deceptive business practices [source: FTC].

In addition, if the scam involved an Internet or e-mail component, you could report it to the FBI's Crime Complaint Center. If the scammer used a legitimate Web site or Internet auction site to involve you in a money-making scam, lodging a complaint with the site -- no matter where in the world you live -- may give you an avenue to recoup some of your funds. Even so, it's unlikely you'll see much, if any, of your money returned.

Finally, don't rely on Web sites offering scam recovery services. You could be entering into another scam. Not only will you not get your money back, but you may be asked to front more cash in an effort to recover your investment [source: Texas Attorney General].