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How do you get a job as a spa reviewer?

        Money | Careers

Who wouldn't want to make money just by relaxing or receiving a massage? If you need a job that allows you to take a load off - literally, look into being a spa reviewer.
Who wouldn't want to make money just by relaxing or receiving a massage? If you need a job that allows you to take a load off - literally, look into being a spa reviewer.
Ridofranz/Thinkstock

Imagine yourself in the lap of luxury as you take in treatments at the world's top spas, your only worry whether to stick to the traditional massage or go for a sea-salt body scrub. Now, imagine you not only got to enjoy these top-of-the-line treatments at no cost, but you actually got paid to partake in them. Such is the life of the world's most skilled spa reviewers, who tour spas and take in treatments to help casual spa goers determine where to spend their dollars.

If you'd like to break into the industry, be prepared for some stiff competition — after all, there's no shortage of people willing to take the job! Start by familiarizing yourself with the various sources for spa reviews, which include industry magazines and directories as well as travel and lifestyle publications. Some popular sites include Spa Finder, Spa Life, Organic Spa, Say Spa and American Spa, each of which maintains online and printed lists of spa reviews. Read existing reviews to learn the lingo and to understand what reviewers focus on. Finally, brush up on your writing and grammar skills, even if it simply means writing reviews about your own spa experiences that no one else will read.

Once you have an idea of what a professional spa review looks like, it's time to reach out to potential employers. Email or write to each publication you're considering and ask about its submission policy. Request a copy of the editorial calendar, which indicates the focus of each issue or month — this can help you tailor your queries to help you stand out. Submit samples according to the submission policy, and follow up to keep your name fresh in the minds of the editors.

If you can't seem to land a job as a paid spa reviewer, consider starting your own online review site. Susie Ellis, president of Spa Finder, started out working at various spas before launching her respected spa directory and review site. She now goes for a massage about once a week, and other treatments on a monthly basis, all while earning around $90,000 per year [source: Lenzo]. Even if you don't reach this level of success, you can likely turn a strong social media presence or established spa review blog into some free treatments and other relaxing perks.


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