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10 Top Tips for Preparing for the MCAT


4
Find a Study Buddy -- or Several
A study group of four to six people can net better test scores -- and emotional support -- for everyone involved.
A study group of four to six people can net better test scores -- and emotional support -- for everyone involved.
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Studying by yourself has its perks, but a study group can often produce better results than a solo effort. You can review more topics, share answers and compare notes. Plus, it can be fun. A group of like-minded, supportive students will explain concepts to each other and spend time figuring out why they reach different answers to the same question, all of which add depth to your study experience. It's possible that you might even spend more time studying than you otherwise would have because of a good group dynamic [source: CollegeBoard].

But remember that when it comes to study groups, the smaller the better. A Harvard study reported that smaller groups led to more engagement and individual participation. When the grades of students studying by themselves were compared with those in studying in groups of four to six, researchers determined that students who studied in such small groups did better than students studying alone [source: Fiske].

Don't forget why you're all assembled, though. Making sure your study group stays productive is easy: Establish a time limit to keep everybody on task [source: CollegeBoard]. Knowing there's only a certain amount of time to review the material will set a focused tone for your sessions.