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How Planning a Charity Event Works


Other Tips for Planning a Charity Event
Any celebrity, A-list or D-list, adds interest to a charity event. Here, members of Stone Temple Pilots perform at the St. Jude Rock 'n' Roll Hope Show in West Hollywood, Calif.
Any celebrity, A-list or D-list, adds interest to a charity event. Here, members of Stone Temple Pilots perform at the St. Jude Rock 'n' Roll Hope Show in West Hollywood, Calif.
David Livingston/Getty Images

Few events go off without a hitch, even if professional-grade planners have agonized over every last detail. For those who intend to plan another charity event in the future, it's wise to take steps to determine what went well and what needed improvement. To that end, short evaluation forms can reveal the good, the bad and the ugly, and help the planning committee avoid the same fate in the future. For example, if all of the respondents trash the caterer, perhaps it's time to trade in that partnership for a new company with a more solid and tastier reputation.

Event planning is so exhausting that it's seriously tempting to avoid post-event responsibilities. It may seem at times that the volunteers have been solely responsible for the entire shindig, but in reality, a truly great event requires a multitude of people to join forces. The donors who so generously provided goods and services for auction, giveaways and the like deserve to be recognized in some form or fashion for their efforts. More often than not, a simple hand-written thank you note is all it takes to make donors feel appreciated and inclined to donate again next time.

By the same token, weary volunteers who have devoted nights, weekends and energy to the cause should also be recognized for their hard work. Often, volunteers who feel undervalued will hesitate to return to the event committee in the future. A pat on the back is often all that's necessary to re-energize a volunteer and get him or her ready for the next go-round. Event leaders should also consider polling volunteers to discover their opinion of how the planning process was handled and how the final event turned out. Volunteers in the thick of the event frequently can provide detailed insight regarding how improvements can be made, and may even be prime candidates for leadership positions in the future.


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