Many organizations that help disabled veterans need volunteers.

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As of 2007, there were 23.6 million military veterans living in the United States. The same 2007 census reported that 6 million of those veterans living in the United States were disabled, a sad reality of war [source: Info Please]. According to those statistics, one in four veterans is disabled, and while the majority of them are over the age of 65, many younger soldiers have been added to that list since 2007 as the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq continue.

As you can imagine, returning from war with a disability can be an incredibly difficult transition --but you have the ability to make this transition easier. Many disabled veterans suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, a disorder that's generally developed after a terrifying event in which the victim is subjected to extreme physical harm or a life-threatening situation [source: NIMH]. In these cases, it's best to seek out professional help to deal with the problem at hand, but you can do your part by lending an ear and spending time with disabled veterans who may just need someone to talk to.

Those veterans suffering physical injury may need help achieving daily goals that many of us take for granted, such as grocery shopping and taking out the garbage. We can all make a difference by volunteering our help with these everyday chores. On top of that, those who own businesses can make a huge impact by hiring disabled veterans. There are also a number of grants set aside to help disabled veterans, particularly for education [source: Accessible]. Often times, the application process necessary to receive these grants is long and arduous, but the payoff is well worth it. You can help these men and women by assisting them with the process.

There are also a number of organizations set up to help disabled veterans. You can help by volunteering or making a donation to any of them. Read on to find out more about what they do.