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5 Tips for Unconventional Job Development


4
Blog Your Way to a Job
A blogger reports from the 2009 G-20 summit in Pittsburgh, Penn. Many young reporters covered the gathering without being formally employed by news organizations.
A blogger reports from the 2009 G-20 summit in Pittsburgh, Penn. Many young reporters covered the gathering without being formally employed by news organizations.
Jason Andrew/Getty Images

A blog can be an excellent way to establish your brand -- but remember, your goal is to get a job, not become a Web celebrity. Your posts should be professional in both tone and content. The idea is to present yourself as someone who's passionate about what you do and eager to learn more. Link to articles about the latest developments in your field and add your own ideas to the mix. Give examples from your past work experience, but don't advertise your employment status. Feel free to feature a link to your resume, so employers can get a better feel for your style.

A word of warning, though: Everyone isn't born to blog. If you don't like sharing your opinions in an open forum and spending hours each day on the computer searching for relevant links and posting your own thoughtful responses, then blogging probably isn't for you. Blogs should be reserved for strong, engaging writers who have the energy to frequently update their sites [source: Johnston].

If you don't have the time or interest to start your own blog, you can still use blogging tools to make contact with potential employers [source: Hawn]. Start with the official blogs of your favorite companies. If it accepts comments, start responding to relevant posts. Make sure that you register with the site; your posts will include a picture, a name and your contact info. If one of the bloggers takes notice and comments on one of your responses, consider it an invitation to upgrade the relationship. See if his or her name links to an e-mail address and ask for a chat.