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10 Recession Era Scams

        Money | Scams

7
Work from Home
It's not uncommon to find a job that allows you to work from home, but some scammers ask for their victims' credit-card numbers, or have them ship illegal goods.
It's not uncommon to find a job that allows you to work from home, but some scammers ask for their victims' credit-card numbers, or have them ship illegal goods.
Digital Vision/Thinkstock

You know it as the ol' "earn $1,000 a day working from the comfort of your living room" routine. In a typical work-from-home scam, a company advertises a DVD or CD that it claims can teach you how to make lots of money by working for yourself. As if this wasn't already too good to be true, the company also offers a free 30-day trial. All the customer has to do is pay shipping costs. And provide credit card information just in case they want to keep the product.

The CD or DVD, Allison Southwick of the Better Business Bureau says, is usually worthless. But that doesn't stop scammers from continuing to bill their victims, even after the merchandise has been returned. "Victims start getting billed $80 a month and they can't stop it."

The work from home swindle not only drains bank accounts; it can also land its target behind bars. A popular work from home scam is a "reshipping" job, which drafts unwitting victims to ship illegal goods out of the country.


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